Using Visual.ly in your maths lessons

If haven't already seen it visual.ly is the webs best collection of info graphics and basically a statisticians dream.  Visually takes any concept and breaks it down into the simplest key statistics and facts relating to thousands of topics.

As a maths teacher this offers a wealth of data to inform students and a great starting point to lead to larger mathematical questions.

For Instance the info graphic below is related to the explosion of Halloween Stores across the United States.  Take a look at this with your own students and do some of your own research in these areas to see how your students compare to the national average.  This will lead you to seek out further statistical information regarding your findings.

There are a multitude of options for using maths and writing in Visual.ly and it will really engage your students because it is current, topical and looks amazing.  Access it here.

 

Lesson Plan: Surveying Data and Creating a Graph

This is a single lesson aimed at upper primary aged students (aged 9 -12 ) about collecting data, creating graphs and analysing the data you have collected.  All of the resoruces are contained within the planner.

Download the entire PowerPoint Presentation here. (recommnded)

Download a PDF of the lesson plan here.

View more presentations from Kevin Cummins.

•This lesson will assist students in further developing their knowledge of fractions, decimals and percentage.

•The data collected can also be used in developing an understanding of graphical representation in the form of graphs; for example: Pie, linear, bar graphs etc.

Lesson Plan: Surveying Data and Creating a Graph

This is a single lesson aimed at upper primary aged students (aged 9 -12 ) about collecting data, creating graphs and analysing the data you have collected.  All of the resoruces are contained within the planner.

Download the entire PowerPoint Presentation here. (recommnded)

Download a PDF of the lesson plan here.

 

 

 

 

Lesson plan survey and data generation
•This lesson will assist students in further developing their knowledge of fractions, decimals and percentage.
•The data collected can also be used in developing an understanding of graphical representation in the form of graphs; for example: Pie, linear, bar graphs etc. 

Create Graphs straight from your browser with ChartGo

What is it?: This is my pick of the week by a long margin.  Chartgo.com is a great resource for creating a range of graphs in seconds online.  You do not need to register which always proves a class concentration killer and offers a range of styles of graphs from simple through to complex.  There is more than enough here to satisfy the juniors through to tertiary maths students.  my only complaint about this is that you cannot embed your finished graph onto your blog or web space.  You can however add a link to your chart.

How can I use this in the classroom? There are a number of applications in maths, for chartgo particularly in the are of statistics and data.  You might start out small by simply completing a simple class survey and graphing the results through to a complex statistical record of events in physics or chemistry.

Give this a shot in your next maths lesson, look forward to hearing how you use have used Chartgo for your needs.

Lesson Plan: Creating a Pictograph

Welcome to the first of many video tutorials.  I have deliberately kept this weeks very simple as I am trying to learn some new technology myself.  Pictographs are a great maths lesson for junior students to explore graphing and data in the early years of schooling.  This video tutorial below explains all the steps to get you and your students to produce a pictograph in no time. The aim of these video tutorials is that you can sit back and learn alongside your students.  Enjoy and feedback is always appreciated.

Excellent web based generator for teachers and students

Create a Graph is very simple to use web based Graph Generator that I can highly recommend for younger students who may find a spreadsheet such as Excel a little daunting.  A very simple interface lets you select from Bar, Line, X&Y, Area and Pie graphs and takes you through each stage of the graph making process in simple to understand language.

There are examples and tutorials, not that you will need them and you can output graphs as either a traditional paper based printout or get a hyperlink to view your graph online.

Be sure to take a look at Create a Graph next time you are doing a statistics and data lesson with your kids and want to generate a graph simply whilst teaching your kids the steps required along the way.It's free of course with no sign up required and there are a few other useful tools to be found on this site also.

By the way if you are looking for a great lesson plan on Creating Pictographs on Computer with younger students.  Here is one from my lesson plan section.

Google Public Data Explorer - An excellent maths resource

Just found this today and I would definitely recommend taking a look at it with your students especially if you are looking at chance and data.

Google Public Data Explorer, a part of Google Labs experiments, is a tool that helps you explore through and visualize public datasets that are made available by government and other agencies that track stats, from around the world.

public data explorer 1

There are a number of datasets available. You can check out the government debt in Europe or visualize the unemployment rate in the United States, see how the US population is growing or the variations in prices of natural gases around the world.

It offers four kinds of visualizations for most of the datasets: line chart, bar chart, map or bubble chart. You can easily switch from one chart format to the other.

public data explorer 2

You could also compare the data for specific countries for datasets that aggregate data from an entire continent. For example, in the graph, I’ve compared the broadband penetration rate in specific countries in Europe.

public data explorer 3

The charts and maps can also be embedded in your website or blog. Overall, a nice tool for students and scholars and could definitely aid in their research on a topic.



BBC Data Art - Visualise the web

Data Visualisation is a great way to make sense of the amazing amount of data avaialble to us in 2010 and the BBC have being getting all creative to bring us their latest offering BBC Data Art.  Here are a few examples of how it works.

  • Flared Music

    Flared Music

    Flared Music is a simple Flash visualisation which shows relationships between musicians as stored in the BBC Music / Musicbrainz database.

    Read more »

  • 3d Documentary Explorer

    3d Documentary Explorer

    A visualisation using a BBC documentary as its data source. Explore material used in the making of the programme in 3d.

    Read more »

  • SearchWeb

    SearchWeb

    See how BBC search results are distributed across different sections of the site, and use the tree structure to navigate.

    Read more »

  • News  Globe

    News Globe

    Search for BBC News and Sport articles and see the place names in them geocoded onto a 3D globe.

    Read more »

Check it out here.