Charlie & The Chocolate Factory Teaching Resources

Teaching Roald Dahl's classic "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory is a guaranteed winner".  Kids love reading the book, which is simple on the surface and can be finished within a week or two. Which gives you a nice time frame to analyze it.

There are also two very diverse films that offer polarizing interpretations of the story, Both,  are never the less enjoyable and valuable to watch to enhance the understanding the messages and morals of the story.

And finally, "Charlie" is great fun and offers students and teachers 'A world of pure imagination' to explore and dissect.

After teaching Charlie for a couple of years now I have compiled some great resources that will easily fill your literacy sessions for a fortnight and offer some creative and insightful learning opportunities.

Below I have made them available for you to download.

I would recommend spreading all of these tasks over two weeks.  And ensure that you have read the book first, as a class or individuals.  Schedule two literacy sessions to watch both versions of the film.

The bulk of class time could be used for students to complete tasks from the Blooms grid.  It is a great idea to spend 15 minutes each day teaching a mini lesson about one of the activities at the beginning of each session to reinforce student understanding.

I usually conclude the unit by getting students to write an essay on one of the topics  below once they have developed a complete understanding of the book. 

Students also enjoy enjoy compiling a handful of their best work over the time period and sharing them.

Structure it as you like, however and if you create any other great resources please send them through to us and we will add them to this collection.

Download The Blooms Multiple Intelligence Grid

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Download the Character Analysis Venn Diagrams, 

Charlie-and-the-choclate-venn-diagram-Tim-Burton.JPG
Charlie-and-the-choclate-venn-diagram-Willy-Wonka.JPG
3 way venn diagram.JPG
Essay Topics.JPG

Update:  New Idea from Shelley in Texas, Students can design a new room for the factory as either a written or visual task.

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory
$9.99
Starring Johnny Depp, Freddie Highmore, Helena Bonham Carter, David Kelly
Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory
$2.99
Starring Gene Wilder, Jack Albertson, Peter Ostrum, Roy Kinnear, Julie Dawn Cole

The Ultimate Guide to Teaching Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

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Charlie and the Chocolate factory is one of the most popular children's books of all time.  It is a brilliantly written story by Author Roald Dahl and there has been two starkly different, but very popular films based on it.

Therefore "Charlie" offers a multitude of teaching and learning opportunities based around the themes of bad parenting, mischievous children, greed, gluttony and much more.  Roald Dahl uses little Charlie Bucket as a role model to oppose all of the horrible aspects of the other children selected to enter Willy Wonka's chocolate factory.

This Grid I have constructed uses Blooms Taxonomy as a framework to study the book and films and has 42 excellent teaching and learning ideas.

It would be recommended that the book and both films are watched to get the most out of this grid, and there is more than enough here to keep your students busy and enthused for a fortnight depending upon how you structure your learning sessions.

I hope you like the Charlie and the Chocolate Factory Learning Grid and if you have any fresh ideas to add to it we would love to hear them.

Download the grid here.

Blooms Taxonomy Poster for Teachers and Students.

Bloom's Taxonomy has helped teachers plan lessons and design instruction for decades now.

 

While other theories and systems have come and gone, Bloom's taxonomy appears to have become the most commonly used standard in many educational settings.

In the 1990's, Lorin Anderson and a group of psychologists updated the taxonomy in the hope that it would have more relevance for 21st century students and teachers, transforming the nouns to verbs and making some other seemingly small but significant changes.

The Blooming Butterfly poster was designed by the Learning Today product development team as a tribute to Bloom and Anderson and to the educators all over the world that continue to implement their vision. We hope that it will serve as a visual reminder for teachers as they continue to guide students to become better thinkers, just as Bloom imagined many years ago!

The Poster Can be Downloaded here.

Writing Objectives Linked to Bloom's Taxonomy

Various researchers have summarized how to use Bloom’s Taxonomy. Following are four interpretations that you can use as guides in helping to write objectives using Bloom’s Taxonomy.

Bloom’s Taxonomy divides the way people learn into three domains. One of these is the cognitive domain, which emphasizes intellectual outcomes. This domain is further divided into categories or levels. The key words used and the type of questions asked may aid in the establishment and encouragement of critical thinking, especially in the higher levels.

LevelLevel AttributesKeywordsQuestions

1: KnowledgeExhibits previously learned material by recalling facts, terms, basic concepts and answers.who, what, why, when, omit, where, which, choose, find, how, define, label, show, spell, list, match, name, relate, tell, recall, selectWhat is ...? How is ...? Where is ...? When did _______ happen? How did ______ happen? How would you explain ...? Why did ...? How would you describe ...? When did ...? Can you recall ...? How would you show ...? Can you select ...? Who were the main ...? Can you list three ...? Which one ...? Who was ...?

2: ComprehensionDemonstrating understanding of facts and ideas by organizing, comparing, translating, interpreting, giving descriptions and stating main ideas.compare, contrast, demonstrate, interpret, explain, extend, illustrate, infer, outline, relate, rephrase, translate, summarize, show, classifyHow would you classify the type of ...? How would you compare ...? contrast ...? Will you state or interpret in your own words ...? How would you rephrase the meaning ...? What facts or ideas show ...? What is the main idea of ...? Which statements support ...? Can you explain what is happening . . . what is meant . . .? What can you say about ...? Which is the best answer ...? How would you summarize ...?

3: ApplicationSolving problems by applying acquired knowledge, facts, techniques and rules in a different way.apply, build, choose, construct, develop, interview, make use of, organize, experiment with, plan, select, solve, utilize, model, identifyHow would you use ...? What examples can you find to ...? How would you solve _______ using what you have learned ...? How would you organize _______ to show ...? How would you show your understanding of ...? What approach would you use to ...? How would you apply what you learned to develop ...? What other way would you plan to ...? What would result if ...? Can you make use of the facts to ...? What elements would you choose to change ...? What facts would you select to show ...? What questions would you ask in an interview with ...?

4: AnalysisExamining and breaking information into parts by identifying motives or causes; making inferences and finding evidence to support generalizations.analyze, categorize, classify, compare, contrast, discover, dissect, divide, examine, inspect, simplify, survey, take part in, test for, distinguish, list, distinction, theme, relationships, function, motive, inference, assumption, conclusionWhat are the parts or features of ...? How is _______ related to ...? Why do you think ...? What is the theme ...? What motive is there ...? Can you list the parts ...? What inference can you make ...? What conclusions can you draw ...? How would you classify ...? How would you categorize ...? Can you identify the difference parts ...? What evidence can you find ...? What is the relationship between ...? Can you make a distinction between ...? What is the function of ...? What ideas justify ...?

5: SynthesisCompiling information together in a different way by combining elements in a new pattern or proposing alternative solutions.build, choose, combine, compile, compose, construct, create, design, develop, estimate, formulate, imagine, invent, make up, originate, plan, predict, propose, solve, solution, suppose, discuss, modify, change, original, improve, adapt, minimize, maximize, delete, theorize, elaborate, test, improve, happen, changeWhat changes would you make to solve ...? How would you improve ...? What would happen if ...? Can you elaborate on the reason ...? Can you propose an alternative ...? Can you invent ...? How would you adapt ________ to create a different ...? How could you change (modify) the plot (plan) ...? What could be done to minimize (maximize) ...? What way would you design ...? What could be combined to improve (change) ...? Suppose you could _______ what would you do ...? How would you test ...? Can you formulate a theory for ...? Can you predict the outcome if ...? How would you estimate the results for ...? What facts can you compile ...? Can you construct a model that would change ...? Can you think of an original way for the ...?

6: EvaluationPresenting and defending opinions by making judgments about information, validity of ideas or quality of work based on a set of criteria.award, choose, conclude, criticize, decide, defend, determine, dispute, evaluate, judge, justify, measure, compare, mark, rate, recommend, rule on, select, agree, interpret, explain, appraise, prioritize, opinion, ,support, importance, criteria, prove, disprove, assess, influence, perceive, value, estimate, influence, deductDo you agree with the actions ...? with the outcomes ...? What is your opinion of ...? How would you prove ...? disprove ...? Can you assess the value or importance of ...? Would it be better if ...? Why did they (the character) choose ...? What would you recommend ...? How would you rate the ...? What would you cite to defend the actions ...? How would you evaluate ...? How could you determine ...? What choice would you have made ...? What would you select ...? How would you prioritize ...? What judgment would you make about ...? Based on what you know, how would you explain ...? What information would you use to support the view ...? How would you justify ...? What data was used to make the conclusion ...? Why was it better that ...? How would you prioritize the facts ...? How would you compare the ideas ...? people ...?From: http://www.umuc.edu/ugp/ewp/bloomtax.html

Bloom’s Ranking of Thinking Skills

KnowledgeComprehensionApplicationAnalysisSynthesisEvaluation

List, Name, Identify, Show, Define, Recognize, Recall, State, VisualizeSummarize, Explain, Interpret, Describe, Compare, Paraphrase, Differentiate, Demonstrate, ClassifySolve, Illustrate, Calculate, Use, Interpret, Relate, Manipulate, Apply, ModifyAnalyze, Organize, Deduce, Contrast, Compare, Distinguish, Discuss, Plan, DeviseDesign, Hypothesize, Support, Schematize, Write, Report, JustifyEvaluate, Choose, Estimate, Judge, Defend, CriticizeFrom: http://www.stedwards.edu/cte/bwheel.htm

Task Oriented Question Construction Wheel Based on Bloom’s Taxonomy

Task Oriented Question Construction Wheel Based on Bloom’s Taxonomy.

©2001 St. Edward’s University Center for Teaching Excellence.

http://www.stedwards.edu/cte/bwheel.htm

From: http://epitome.ce.gatech.edu/iowa/how.html

According to Benjamin Bloom, and his colleagues, there are six levels of cognition:

  1. Knowledge: rote memorization, recognition, or recall of facts
  2. Comprehension: understanding what the facts mean
  3. Application: correct use of the facts, rules, or ideas
  4. Analysis: breaking down information into component parts
  5. Synthesis: combination of facts, ideas, or information to make a new whole
  6. Evaluation: judging or forming an opinion about the information or situation

Ideally, each of these levels should be covered in each course and, thus, at least one objective should be written for each level. Depending on the nature of the course, a few of these levels may need to be given more emphasis than the others.

Below are examples of objectives written for each level of Bloom’s Taxonomy and activities and assessment tools based on those objectives. Common key verbs used in drafting objectives are also listed for each level.

LevelLevel AttributesKeywordsExample ObjectiveExample ActivityExample Assessment

1: KnowledgeRote memorization, recognition, or recall of facts.list, recite, define, name, match, quote, recall, identify, label, recognize“By the end of this course, the student will be able to recite Newton’s three laws of motion.”Have students group up and perform simple experiments to the class showing how one of the laws of motion works.Use the following question on an exam or homework. “Recite Newton’s three laws of motion.”

2: ComprehensionUnderstanding what the facts mean.describe, explain, paraphrase, restate, give original examples of, summarize, interpret, discuss“By the end of this course, the student will be able to explain Newton’s three laws of motion in his/her own words.”Group students into pairs and have each pair think of words that describe motion. After a few minutes, ask pairs to volunteer some of their descriptions and write these descriptions on the board.Assign the students to write a simple essay that explains what Newton’s laws of motion mean in his/her own words.

3: ApplicationCorrect use of the facts, rules, or ideas.calculate, predict, apply, solve, illustrate, use, demonstrate, determine, model“By the end of this course, the student will be able to calculate the kinetic energy of a projectile.”After presenting the kinetic energy equation in class, have the students pair off for just a few minutes and practice using it so that they feel comfortable with it before being assessed.On a test, define a projectile and ask the students to “Calculate the kinetic energy of the projectile.”

4: AnalysisBreaking down information into component parts.classify, outline, break down, categorize, analyze, diagram, illustrate“By the end of this course, the student will be able to differentiate between potential and kinetic energy.”Present the students with different situations involving energy and ask the students to categorize the energy as either kinetic or potential then have them explain in detail why they categorized it the way they did, thus breaking down what exactly makes up kinetic and potential energy.Give the students an assignment that asks them outline the basic principles of kinetic and potential energy. Ask them to point out the differences between the two as well as how they are related.

5: SynthesisCombining parts to make a new whole.design, formulate, build, invent, create, compose, generate, derive, modify, developBy the end of this section of the course, the student will be able to design an original homework problem dealing with the principle of conservation of energy.”Tie each lecture or discussion to the previous lectures or discussions before it, thus helping the students assemble all the discreet classroom sessions into a unified topic or theory.Give the students a project in which they must design an original homework problem dealing with the principle of conservation of energy.

6: EvaluationJudging the value or worth of information or ideas.choose, support, relate, determine, defend, judge, grade, compare, contrast, argue, justify, support, convince, select, evaluate“By the end of the course, the student will be able to determine whether using conservation of energy or conservation of momentum would be more appropriate forsolving a dynamics problem.”Have different groups of students solve the same problem using different methods, then have each group present the pros and cons of the method they chose.On a test, describe a dynamic system and ask the students which method they would use to solve the problem and why.Attachment:Writing Objectives Using Bloom's Taxonomy [PDF, 323 KB]

A wealth of Blooms Based ideas and lessons

I recently came across a great WIKI calledEucational Origami which as a great range of content, but in particular has a 21st century take on Blooms Taxonomy and how to apply it to ICT and today's tech savvy kids.

This update to Bloom's Revised Taxonomy which attempts to account for the new behaviours and actions emerging as technology advances and becomes more ubiquitous. Bloom's Revised Taxonomy accounts for many of the traditional classroom practices, behaviours and actions but does not account for the new processes and actions associated with Web 2.0 technologies and increasing ubiquitous personal and cloud computing.


Bloom's Digital Taxonomy isn't about the tools or technologies rather it is about using these to facilitate learning. Outcomes on rubrics are measured by competence of use and most importantly the quality of the process or product. For example. Bookmarking a resource is of no value if the resource is inappropriate or worthless.  Check it out here.

Generate Blooms based lesson in seconds with the Differentiator

What is it: The Differentiator is a great tool that allows you to turn your simple lesson ideas into full blown Blooms Taxonomy based lesson planner that accommodate all learning styles and processes in seconds.  It is a little confusing at first due to the lack of instruction on the site but I really recommend giving this 5 minutes of your day to play with as it will be in your favourites after you have gone through the process of turning your simple idea into a great lesson planner.

How Does it work? This is the ultimate lesson startup tool. Here is my example for students to remember Australian States

First off you select a thinking Skill: I chose Remembering  the Australian States

Then adding some content: I chose remembering the Essential Facts of The Australian States.

Next Resources: I chose remembering the Essential Facts of The Australian States using web sites

Then the Final Product: I chose remembering the Essential Facts of The Australian States using web sites to create a map.

Go through this process with your kids, and let them be a part of the selection process.  A great and dead simple tool that you can't go past.  Check it out here.

A Brilliant Blooms Based Lesson Starter

What is it:  The Differentiator is a great tool that allows you to turn your simple lesson ideas into full blown Blooms Taxonomy based lesson planner that accommodate all learning styles and processes in seconds.  It is a little confusing at first due to the lack of instruction on the site but I really recommend giving this 5 minutes of your day to play with as it will be in your favourites after you have gone through the process of turning your simple idea into a great lesson planner.

How Does it work?  This is the ultimate lesson startup tool. Here is my example for students to remember Australian States

First off you select a thinking Skill:  I chose Remembering  the Australian States

Then adding some content:  I chose remembering the Essential Facts of The Australian States.

Next Resources:  I chose remembering the Essential Facts of The Australian States using web sites

Then the Final Product:  I chose remembering the Essential Facts of The Australian States using web sites to create a map.

Go through this process with your kids, and let them be a part of the selection process.  A great and dead simple tool that you can't go past.  Check it out here.