Latest teaching and learning ideas

The Latest in Tech, Tools and Toys for Teachers.  Lesson Plans, Classroom resources and ideas for busy teachers.  iPad Apps and Android Apps for teachers and students.

Bebras Australia Computational Thinking Challenge

The next round of the BEBRAS Australia computational thinking challenge is occurring over the following weeks for teachers and students from years 3 - 12.

This is similar to challenges such as the Math's Olympiad but is more focused on general problem solving and use of logic. It is completely free and offers amazing data and analytics for students and teachers who are participating.

Above all else Bebras offers highly engaging resources and teaching and learning opportunities which are globally recognised as key components of a 21st century curriculum.

I can't recommend this enough for all teachers and am confident it will become a regular event on your school calendar.

http://www.bebras.edu.au/

Seven simple poetry styles your students will love

Poetry is one of the few styles of writing which openly encourages students to let go of their emotions and share them with others.

This is not an easy thing for students to do and can the process can be made even more difficult if we expect them to write deep and meaningful styles of poetry such as ballads and free verse without developing an appreciation and understanding of poetry through fun and simple structure.

These eight styles of poetry are a great entry point for teachers and students to approach poetry with confidence yet still allow for creativity and emotion to be part of the writing process.

Each style contains a clear structure you can teach your students by following the instructions, alongside diagrams and the highly recommended audio recordings by our resident voice actor Alan Munro.  Just click the audio button for each style.

These poems come from a collection of 19 styles of poetry from Innovative Teaching Ideas which include 44 pages of templates, rubrics and more for all major styles of poetry.

Clerihew

A Clerihew is a light hearted poem consisting of two couplets and a specific rhyming scheme of AABB.

A clerihew usually deals with a person or character within the first line.

Clerihews have frequently been used to mock famous people such as politicians and celebrities.

As a class start with a familiar character such as Harry Potter and compare efforts.

 

The Epitaph

An epitaph is a brief poem inscribed on a tombstone praising a deceased person, usually with rhyming lines.

Epitaph’s are usually written in a light hearted manner but they can be serious if need be.

Epitaphs have a simple rhyming pattern of AABB

Epitaphs can be used to teach us a lesson for example why we shouldn’t eat candy too often.

 

Irish Limerick

A Limerick is a rhyming humorous or nonsense poem of five lines.

It has a rhyming pattern of AABBA

Lines 1, 2 & 5 should contain 7 – 10 syllables

Lines 3 & 4 should have 5 – 7 syllables

Limericks frequently start with “there once was a…”

 

Palindrome

A palindrome or shadow poem reads  identical both forwards or backwards.

You must use the same words in the first half of the poem as the second half

Reverse the order for the second half

Use a well considered word in the middle line as a bridge from the first half to the second half of the poem

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Shape and Concrete Poetry

Poetry takes on many forms.  An artistic expression is for your poem to adopt the shape of its subject.

Shape poems are either an outline or fill the space within an outline.  Poetry within a space is also known as concrete poetry.

Any style of poetry or writing can be applied.

Start with an easy shape and change your text size for best fit.

 

Diamante

A Diamante is a seven-lined contrast poem laid out in a diamond shape.   It is highly structured and simple to understand.

Line 1: Noun or subject

Line 2: Two Adjectives

Line 3: Three -ing words

Line 4: Four words about the subject

Line 5: Three -ing words

Line 6: Two adjectives

Line 7: Synonym/antonym for the subject

 

Monorhyme

Monorhyme is a poem in  which the end of all lines rhyme.

There are no rules as to how long or short a monorhyme should be.  Stanzas are not used in monorhyme poetry.

This is a great starting point for developing rhyming skills.

Words ending in Air, Ate, it, Ing &Oh have many rhyming words.

 

I hope you find these styles of poetry useful with your students and remember to check out the entire collection of 19 styles of poetry here.

 

How Apple's new Classroom App will change the way teachers and students use their iPad's

Today's Apple iOS 9.3 comes with some minor updates for personal users that will obviously make the use of their iPhone and iPad more worthwhile.

One thing Apple did not make such a big song and dance about at today's event was the introduction of their new Classroom App.  

In my eyes this was the biggest news of all as it offers a completely new manner in which teachers and students use iPad's in the classroom.

Apple have clearly taken a leaf out of Google's Chrome for Education play book here in allowing teachers and schools to manage their devices in a logical manner, connect apps and students together to make learning on the iPad a far more collaborative experience.  Some of the new features include.

  • For the first time classroom teachers can assign shared iPad's in a logical manner which will keep a profile of settings and documents etc.
  • Assign and manage tasks from a central hub ( Similar to Google Classroom. )
  • Teachers can instantly force all iPad's in their classroom  to launch an app of their choice with just a tap.
  • Alternately they can lock students out with just a tap to regain focus on them.
  • Teachers can tap into a student's individual screen to monitor workflow.
  • Teachers can group students quickly based on iPad apps and student profiles.
  • Airplay functionality has been over hauled to enhance the way in which teachers and students share information across their Apple TV unit in the classroom.

Full details can found here but this is quite simply the biggest update schools have seen in the education scene from Apple since the iPad was released.

Whether or not this is enough to slow down Google's recent domination of the education market with Chromebook's is yet to be seen but it is a clear step in the right direction from Apple who almost had the education market cornered in the first few years of the release of the iPad.

Please note that you must upgrade your iPad's to iOS 9.3 for Apple Classroom to be installed.

I would love to hear your experiences of Apple's new classroom App

How computational thinking has changed professional sports

Billy Beane

Billy Beane

Computational thinking is a really valuable approach or our students to problem solve and introduce them to the world of coding, algorithms and computer science.  It is often difficult to find examples of real world computational thinking that engages students.  

Recently I watched the film 'Moneyball' which upon reflection was a great example of computational thinking in action in which all four elements (decomposing, pattern recognition, abstraction and algorithmic design.) were used to achieve a positive outcome.  I hope you find story useful in better understanding computational thinking and also translating that to your students.

Billy Beane was an average baseball player  shipped around America’s Major League competition in the eighties until he realised he could not achieve the heights he dreamed of, and the teams hiring him realised Billy Beane was not going to take them to the ‘Promised Land.’

Post playing career Billy was hired by the Oakland A’s as their general manager to try and bring them a championship.  Five years into the role Billy came to the realisation that he was trying to win an unfair game.  And it was all because the MLB does not have a salary cap for purchasing players.

This was highlighted in 2001 when the New York Yankees faced the Oakland A’s in a regular season game which drew no major significance except for this...

Team Salary Cap Comparison

Team Payroll Comparison

New York Yankee’s: $144 million

Oakland A’s:  $39 million

Beane conceded his Oakland A’s were little more than a talent incubator for wealthier teams to poach and decided in 2002 things must change or else his career as General Manager would yield the same results as his career as a player.

Against 100 years of tradition and thousands of ‘experts’ advice Beane essentially disbanded the Oakland A’s scouting and development group and entrusted it to Paul De Podesta who was a Harvard Economics Graduate student who knew little about baseball but everything about solving data driven challenges.  He was a great computational thinker.

De Podesta’s mantra was that the Oakland A’s would no longer invest in buying players but would invest in buying win shares.  Beane advised De Podesta as to the statistics and data he believed made an indisputable difference to the win loss column they began statistically to break down every player in Baseball to a single  piece of data  identifying  what impact they had upon winning based upon their salary.

De Podesta identified superstars who were phenomenally overpaid, and nobodies who were absolute steals based upon their measly salaries.

De Podesta

De Podesta

De Podesta  and Beane exemplified all four elements of Computational thinking during this process.

  • De Podesta decomposed their current situation, the elements of success in baseball every player in MLB to a series of statistical value.

  • Beane identified statistical patterns, sequences and structures that occurred in winning baseball teams.

  • They abstracted opinion and discounted irrelevant data which that is unproven in influencing wins and losses in baseball.

  • De Podesta created an algorithm for success based upon statistical data and salary which reinvented the Oakland A’s team and still fit well within their salary limit.

Oakland started the season poorly under a cloud of criticism from all corners of the baseball world.  Outwardly it appeared as if Oakland traded or dumped their most treasured players and replaced them with trash.

Amidst early mounting losses and criticism both Beane and De Podesta believed they had done their research and stood by their formula for success.

To cut a long story short the Oakland A’s started to become the team which Beane and Depodesta envisioned even though they were in the eyes of many nothing more than a washed up, rag tag B league team.

They went on the longest winning streak in professional baseball in a century (20 games) and finished atop their division with a win loss record of 103-59.  This was exceptional when considering they had a losing record over the first third of the season.

They did not win the championship in 2002 but the Boston Redsox adopted Beane and DePodesta’s “moneyball”  approach in 2003 and won the ultimate prize in 2004.  

Beane was offered the highest paying contract in sports amangement in 2003 by the Boston Redsox which he turned down. He is still the GM of the Oakland Athletics.

DePodesta has moved around multiple U.S sporting teams and even leagues to share his Computational Thinking  approach to winning and losing which is valued by nearly every major professional sport as an essential element for accountability and success.